Upcoming ICD-10 Changes

oct1CMS is making some changes to the ICD-10-CM codes, effective October 1, 2016. In some cases, CMS added new codes and retired others. In other cases, only the description associated with the code changed.

Although these changes are not nearly as sweeping as the transition from ICD-9 to ICD-10 last year, there are some similarities:

  • October 1 is the so-called “cutover date.” The updated codes apply only to claims with a service date of October 1 or later. Claims with a service date of September 30 or earlier will continue to use the current codes.
  • Eyefinity has your back. We’re currently updating Eyefinity EHR and ExamWRITER to properly code your exams based on the selections you make during the exam and the date of service. In other words, keep coding the way you always have, and we’ll take care of the rest. We’re also updating the ICD-10 codes in our practice management systems for billing and reporting.
  • Billers should familiarize themselves with the changes. Billers should be prepared to verify that the correct codes are appearing on claims

Eyefinity has identified over 400 ICD-10 changes that apply to eyecare. Code changes to the following areas take effect on October 1, 2016:

  • Diabetes
  • Retinal vein occlusion
  • Age-related macular degeneration
  • Primary open-angle glaucoma
  • Amblyopia
  • Postprocedural hematoma or seroma

We anticipate that CMS will modify ICD-10 codes slightly every year.

We’re adding the ICD-10 changes to OfficeMate/ExamWRITER now, which will be available in a service pack in September. You’ll need to download and install the service pack before October 1 to avoid any disruption in billing.

Eyefinity EHR, Eyefinity Practice Management, and AcuityLogic updates are scheduled in September and will include all of the ICD-10 updates.

To read more about the ICD-10 changes taking effect on October 1, check out CMS’ ICD-10-CM Official Guidelines.

New Videos Available on the Meaningful Use Resource Center

To help users in the daunting process of Modified Stage 2, Eyefinity has put together a resource center dedicated to achieve meaningful use in any practice.

“Users will have a choice of using the written documentation, or watching the videos when they move through the meaningful use process,” says Rebecca Johnson, Director of Education.

The resource center includes videos and written documentation that explain each measure, describe any available exclusion, and give you step-by-step instructions on how to achieve each measure using Eyefinity software.

The training videos and documentation that are available on the resource center are useful for doctors who may be low on a particular measure as well as for training new staff to help them participate in helping the practice achieve its meaningful use goals.

Eyefinity offers these additional solutions to ensure that practices have everything they need to run a successful and thriving business.

Useful Links:

Meaningful Use Resource Center: https://www.officemate.net/mu_resources.aspx

Eyefinity Training & Education: https://www.officemate.net/training.aspx

PROOF_5497-16-EFDR_blog_EHR_BandTogether.jpg