Ease Your Transition to EHR with Comprehensive Training

By Robert L. Bass, OD, FAAO

In moving to EHR, good training and a well-paced adaptation period can ease the transition. Free training is available from your vendor–and supplemental training may be worth the added expense.

Robert BassTransitioning to electronic health records is not a simple intuitive process. Even the most user-friendly systems require training and practice. If you neglect to adequately prepare yourself and your staff for the transition to EHR, you won’t be able to use the system to its full potential. There will be functions the system has that you won’t know how to tap into, and you probably will make mistakes when inputting patient data. These mistakes could lead to the system not being able to provide you with the information you need to provide superior care, meaning you may not be able to easily access the patient’s medical history and past product preferences, among other data. Here is how my practice trained and practiced for the implementation of Eyefinity Practice Management, OfficeMate Edition and Eyefinity EHR, ExamWRITER Edition.

Read the entire article: Ease Your Transition to EHR with Comprehensive Training

Reprinted with permission from Review of Optometric Business.

See Your Practice Like Never Before with eyeReports

Advanced Reporting Can Help Your Business Grow & Save Time and Money

OfficeMate users already enjoy a wide range of reporting options from the various tabs within the Reports and Statements window. Now, users of later versions of OfficeMate can benefit from a new generation of practice management reports and graphs from eyeReports, a new OfficeMate Certified Partner. These reports are designed to help practices mine through the data, identify trends, and realize financial success.

EyeReports leverages advanced features within Microsoft Excel to query the OfficeMate SQL database to give you enhanced financial analysis and practice metric reports and graphs. You’ll be able to see your practice results like never before and gain greater insights to help make intelligent business decisions.

“With the power of eyeReports,” Stephen Rosenbaum, CEO of eyeReports, explains,” eyecare professionals can look at their results in a whole new light. The valuable data needed to manage and grow practices are presented clearly and concisely in eyeReports, which helps eyecare professionals question, analyze, compare, and understand results to make informed strategic plans to grow their business.”

New reports are routinely added and included in the annual license fee, and you can request reports from the community of users. Are you a member of ODExcellence or other consulting groups? Ask if a report is available to gather the benchmarking data you need to regularly report to your group.

For more information about eyeReports or to request a personal demonstration, visit www.eyereports.biz/officemate or call 760.689.2452.

Are You Focused on Your Practice?

Focus 2011

Focus 2011. September 20, 2011, Las Vegas.

Is your eyecare business prepared to attract new patients, retain current patients and stand out from the competition? To address this question, Eyefinity is hosting “FOCUS 2011: The Patient Experience Made Simple” on September 20th at the MGM Grand Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas. This educational event is conveniently held just prior to Vision Expo West.

Designed for practice managers and office decision makers, FOCUS 2011 features leading marketing and business innovators who will share what’s shaping today’s trends in social media, web presence, search engine optimization, and other web technologies. Attendees will learn how to leverage trends and tools to engage patients and keep their practice competitive.

The event also features a variety of expert speakers, including organizational consultant Dr. Joseph Michelli, best-selling author of Prescription for Excellence: Leadership Lessons for Creating a World Class Customer Experience from UCLA Health System, and The Starbucks Experience: 5 Principles for Turning Ordinary Into Extraordinary. Additional speakers including accomplished practice management experts and industry-leading marketing and branding professionals will be announced in the coming weeks.

Registration for the one-day event is $199 per person. Want to send multiple attendees from one office? If so, send two or more for just $149 per person. Registration is limited to the first 100 people.

Understanding Meaningful Use Objectives, Part 1

A message from James Kirchner, OD, Chief Professional Officer for Eyefinity/OfficeMate:

Dr. James Kirchner

At Eyefinity/OfficeMate, we are celebrating the certification of OfficeMate/ExamWRITER v10. We are excited to be able to produce a certified EHR, which is a critical component of your meaningful use (MU) strategy.

Now it’s time to help you understand the MU objectives. As I promised in my previous articles, I’ll give you the specifics of the 25, MU criteria, so that you can be confident in your ability to use your certified software in a meaningful way. My goal is your success in getting your portion of the stimulus money—all $44,000.

There are 25 objectives as established in the Final Rule by CMS, I’m going to detail all 25 over the next few blog articles. I’ll make them very practical to understand. I’ll begin by detailing the first 15 which are called “core” objectives and CMS expects eligible providers (EPs) to perform all 15. The second set is called “menu,” and you will be expected to perform 5 out of the 10 menu objectives. Therefore, a total of 20 out of the 25 objectives will need to be accomplished for successfully using your certified EHR in a meaningful way.

There are exclusion provisions that have been established, so that you can decide if any of the 15 should be excluded by you. I’ll address the exclusions in the future. For now, let’s go through the list. I’m going to group the objectives by 3 major categories for the sake of clarity. I’ll do the first category in this edition and the other categories in next few blog articles.

Category 1: Recording and Securely Storing Specific Patient Data

  1. Record Demographics
    Record the patient’s preferred language, gender, race, ethnicity, and date of birth.
  2. Maintain a Problem List
    Maintain an up-to-date problem list of current and active diagnoses.
  3. Maintain an Active Medication Allergy List
    Maintain a list of patient medication allergies. If the patient hasn’t any medication allergies, you must record as none.
  4. Maintain an Active Medication List
    Maintain a list of patient medications. If the patient isn’t taking any medications, you must record as none
  5. Record and Chart Vital Signs
    Record height, weight, blood pressure, calculate and display BMI, plot and display growth charts for children 2–20 years of age, including BMI.
  6. Record Smoking Status
    Record the smoking habits of patients 13 years and older.

There you have the first set of MU objectives. Remember that your certified EHR must provide you with the tools to accomplish the tasks listed above, but it will be up to you to do the work.

I know that many of you will be concerned with some of the objectives listed. I mentioned that the CMS Final Rule makes allowances for exclusions. The topic of exclusions is worthy of a complete edition of Trends and Tactics, so stay with me through this series, and I’ll explain them.

That thing the kids are talking about these days… It could help bring your practice patients and additional revenue.

You’ve probably heard about one of these social networking websites in the media: Twitter, Facebook, MySpace. Those are just three of dozens of social networking and information sharing websites on the Internet today.  So, should you and your practice “plug in” to these social networks?

This is a great time for optometric practices to ride the wave of social networking.  Joining most social networks is free, and provides you exposure to thousands of people in your local community and beyond.  In essence, you can begin to market your practice and its services online – via social networking – for no cost.  Beyond marketing, it’s important to communicate the value you and your practice provide through your services and in the community.  So, how do you communicate value using this type of technology?

Practices can use social networking to announce new frame lines or the importance of lens technologies. Have you added Emilio Pucci or Fendi to your frame collection?  This would be a great opportunity to post a “tweet” on Twitter.  Or, educate your patients and potential new customers on the importance of UV protection and children’s eyewear via Facebook.  These are just a few examples to help promote your practice on social networking.

Social networking will bring you patients and referrals with little to moderate effort.  If you’re looking to get started with social networking, I highly recommend this guide I found from Transitions that shows you how to get your practice on Facebook.

Is your practice already immersed in the social networking world? Leave us a comment and share advice or tips for those looking to dip their toe into the water.

Good luck and happy Social Networking!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 58 other followers